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20121129
20121129
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
is the assistant attorney general of the civil rights division in washington, dc, he was nominated for that position by president obama and sworn in in october of 2009 and we are all the lucky -- we are all very lucky that that happened in october of 2009. tom has spent his entire career in public service and on protecting the civil rights of our most vulnerable people. tom actually joined the civil rights division as a young lawyer and while he was there he prosecuted some of the most significant cases in the country. lawyers in the civil rights division get fanned out to places in the country to handle cases in mississippi and alabama and california and all over and tom was one of those people. he was sent to texas to handle a very significant hate crime case when he was a young lawyer that involved a gang of white supremacists that went on a killing spree and ended up shooting 3 people and killing one when he was a young lawyer working in the civil rights division. he later served as a top deputy for attorney general janet reno, he was special counsel to ted kennedy and ser
looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point of view of a parent. four years ago my son shot himself at
. his actions in 2004 thrust this civil rights issue into the national spotlight and cemented his reputation as a fearless public officials who does what he thinks is right. under mayor newsom's energetic leadership the economy grew and the city became an economic center for biotech and clean tech. gach newsom has been a trail blaitzer on combating homelessness and protecting the government. in 2007 he was re-elected as mayor with more than 70 percent of the vote, which is unheard of. please welcome our lieutenant governor, gavin newsom. >> my role was to get tom to speak. i'm just going to jump in because i want to keep you all on time. you've got an agenda packet and i'm going to be held accountable if you don't meet it. roslyn, let's pick up on tom's passion. he told me a couple points that are important, that is the consciousness awareness, this growing consciousness around bullying. and it's a question i guess that requires, has bullying gotten worse or have we gotten better to begin to recognize it? >> hard to know. tom and the president refer to as far too often as
community activists, civil rights activists, that looked like me, that looked like many of us. and then in the newspapers i saw two asians and they were speaking always passionately about asian american civil rights. well, they were professor ling chee wang and henry durham. and when i was actually quite despairing, i was quite despairing, it was coming down it a crucial vote in 2007 and then 2008 for the college board to support this campus, they came to the fore, they organized the community, the community rose up probably one of the first few times in the history of the chinese community in san francisco, they rose up from the ground and they said, we want this campus, we're fighting for this campus and you better vote for this campus, and guess what, we passed it and we got the campus. so this campus has been built and raised and all of us community activists, ling chee wang, all you old-timers, we built it for current generations and generations as yell yet unborn. our forefathers came hear to build the railroads. they came hear to build the railroads but really to build
and identify theft and hate crimes and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being her
or comparisons were exaggeration or scores or i had pershly. but after years of working as a civil rights lawyer and advocate, representing victims of racial profiling and police brutality and investigating patterns of drug law enforcement in poor communities of color and attempting to assist people who had been released from prison, re-enter into a society that had never shown much use for them in the first place, i really had a serious of experiences that began my own awakening. i began to awaken to the reality that far from ending kraft in america, we redesigned it. we create aid vast new system that has managed to relegate african americans to a permanent second-class status again. and it does function in a manner eerily reminiscent of the jim crow system. >> rose: we'll come back to the international dimension of this in a moment, but first i want to introduce this clip from the film. tell me about "the house i live in." >> "the house i live in" was a film i tried to make about the war on drugs, to go to about 25 states across the country and sort of really take stock of the whole profile o
on diversity and civil rights. arpaio told the arizona republic he can, quote, get along great with the hispanics. the hispanics? not exactly spreading the love. here's what arpaio said after winning re-election despite an aggressively challenge from a latino activist. >> i would hope to get together with the latino community if i could ever have them talk to me without screaming and threatening me. >> let the charm offenser begin. arpaio's long and ugly history of getting together with the latino community includes a justice department lawsuit accusing him of racial profiling, lawsuits linked to alleged civil rights violations, and the death of a prisoner while in custody. and recently saying he'll arm deputies with automatic weapons so they can hunt down suspected and undocumented immigrants. arpaio says now, quote, i sure would like to meet with latino community leaders, in the backroom or whatever, have a couple of beers and try to explain. meet in the backroom? a couple of beers? does arpaio really think a happy hour can erase his offensive record? not even a nice try, she
're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you jumped ahead to several of my questions so you don't get to talk anymore. for the rest of the four panellests whoever keep its to two to three minute
you for the support. although we're finding out in this city a lot of people civic and civil rights are being cut back on. we hope you, the board of supervisors, will be like the board of supervisors who brought forth the medical marijuana that now 25 states enjoy. supervisors to create codes and sros will be coming here december 4. you know sros, you talk about domestic violence, you talk about homophobia, racism. it's inside now. people want to get up from the sheets and run to the street, whether they naked or not. you know the naked truth is that we really want you guys to do what chris daly did. he's the only one that built apartments on the corner of bank burger king. the united states two weeks ago we voted for the president. two weeks today. they emo he that the -- know the united states politicians are working three days a week and no times for the citizens. we don't want you to reflect that. i want to remember you board of supervisors. when ross was the supervisor here you only making 33,000. we voted that youz/( -w would me over 115 so that you could do the work -- to san
issuu act on that it can backfire in lots of different ways. i am concerned about civil rights, i'm concerned about free speech, i'm concerned about just changing san francisco's style and how we are as a city. and it's something that's very troubling to me to see that. we're a city that actually had -- the publication of city life that naked lunch came out there was a ban about that. the city looks at free speech and expression, we're a beacon of light to other places around the country and sometimes there's weirdness about how we express ourselves but i think that is what is great about san francisco. i have something teed up that i was saving for before, for chris daly when he used the f word in the board chambers but i think this is more appropriate. catch-22. and think it expresses some of the absurdity of this that we have in the backdrop of world war ii where people are killing each other, the inconsequential nudity that is before the general is sh something that is quite meaningless over all. >> why aren't you wearing clothes, captain? >> don't wanna. >> what do you mean y
've considered and housing for broadly and civil rights more broadly. >> i will use an analogy. i was raised in the country. elephant needed to have a pen, and also a stable, you would ask someone where can i get these facilities. you certainly wouldn't expect that person to direct you to a beehive. and a beehive is where worker bees live. and a stable is where you have larger groups of people that could possibly be there. and since, you know, it's been decided that, you know, oftentimes elephants can't live in beehives, that i suggest that perhaps a beehive isn't as valuable to a city that needs an elephant pen. thank you. >> president chiu: thank you. >> i'm going to be using the overhead. this is my son. can i use the overhead? >> president chiu: sfgov-tv. august 14, 2006. i just want to sayƧ&%( [ that we talking about violence versus nudity. i'm not bringing that up. "k about my child seeing nudity, but i'm worried about them seeing guns and i'm also -- we can continue -- we continue to be ignored as mothers and fathers. every year, every day, every holiday, every birthday, we are ignor
come with me on the civil rights bill, you will be remembered for 200 years. only you and lincoln will be remembered. on the other hand, he gave dirkson every public works project dam that was going to sink illinois. lincoln did the same thing, what ever he was needed, assignments, jobs, the years before civil service. it was easier to do some of this then. >> the guy that stole the movie as far as i'm concerned was the same guy that stole that oliver stone movie "jfk" is tommy lee jones. tommy lee jones, playing thaddeus stevens, my hero, the guy that really did believe in emancipation and reconstruction and 40 acres and a mule and wanted to take the freed african-american and make him a full citizen economically, not just under the law. tell me about that guy. we can talk about lincoln forever. thaddeus stevens, his housekeeper was also his mistress. i loved that scene when we discover that. it is a great performance as well as everything else. >> well, what's so powerful about both tommy lee jones performance and the actual thaddeus stevens is what lincoln had to do was to pers
was working with the house judiciary committee on getting that civil rights bill through, using the cardinal in philadelphia, using boss dick daley in chicago to try to get some members there. he was working, working, working. it is a job, politics. it's an honor and it's a job. you got to do it, and i think the president would learn from this fellow jack kennedy. as gamerrous as this guy was, he was a worker bee when it comes to politics and i think the more the president spends time with members of congress on the hill, the more liberal as well as the more conservative, the more personal sometime he spends with those people the better shot he has at establishing a working relationship. it's not done by the telephone. you go the to meet, you got to get in the same room together. >> words of wisdom. words from history. chris matthews, as ever. thank you so much. >> you're a great colleague, sir. >> thank you, sir. >>> next, why team romney and republicans still don't get it. stay with us. >> of what has happened to this country when i sing "white christmas" now, i will no doubt be deemed to
to negotiate. we passed the civil rights bill. there was, if you will, a precedent in terms of cooperation and climate. as the representative point out, later on that would manifest itself in what was really an unprecedented interaction between the white house and congress on dealing with the invasion to kuwait and trying to pull together a unified perspective. i think the climate -- it was not accidental. we worked awfully hard in order to maintain that. i certainly feel that the key to it was the fact that tom foley and president bush had been members of congress to gather. they had developed a personal relationship. other members of congress, including dave and others, had been there. the president was in the house -- there were personal relationships that we, frankly, in the nicest sense of the word, exploited as much as possible in order to maintain the comedy of the process. one more point, since we were commenting on him -- he was really in my opinion from at least our perspective the heart and soul of the details of this process. barry and others have talked about the importance of
have civil and human rights for all people. the progressive message we say that we should promote dialogue and diplomacy before we ever find ourselves in military conflicts. the progressive message is about an inclusive america. all colors, all cultures, all faiths. and an america that says if you -- if you live in this country and you want to work hard, the economy should be robust and broad enough and fair enough for you to make a good run in this economy. if you work 40 hours a week, you should be able to feed your family. shouldn't have to resort to public assistance. it's talking about having to stand up for the rights of labor, the rights of working men and women. the right to be able to be paid fairly. the right to be able to go to the doctor. the right to be able to look forward to a decent, fair retirement. the right to be able to see that your children will be able to get a good education that can see them through. in other words, the progressive message is the message of an inclusive america that makes sure that our economic and our environmental lives are strong, healt
judiciary, property law and human rights law, trying to expand civil society in ways that will make china flourish in the future. we are lucky to have you. three clique points i want to make before we move on, before we hear from professor alford, cohen and gewirtz. it is important to note that in the cycles of the u.s./china relationship we are entering an extraordinarily interesting period. i can't remember a time in recent history where we have had a president in an election but roughly coincided exactly with the leadership change in beijing. so what have we seen in beijing? in recent weeks, this very month. 2,000 delegates visiting beijing, putting together a slate of 370 committee members, chopping off 25 members of the politburo and some agreement around not 9 but 7 members of the standing committee of the politburo which i would refer to or considered to be the board of directors if it will end a reelected president on this side which is to say we are going to begin the new year with a clean slate and that ability which is so unusual in the u.s./china relationship to start fresh an
that limit civil liberties and limit the rights of women and minorities. steve harrigan has been watching things in cairo with the embassy closed. >>reporter: one section of the embassy that deals with public services was closed during business hours today. it is important to note the embassy was not under target or being attacked but if this neighborhood, really, where i am standing we had two buildings set on fire. we had a car set on fire. a lot of the spillover protesters have turned violent with rocks and tear gas thrown. a message is going out that today is not a good day to pick up your visa, tomorrow, or saturday. >>shepard: what are we expecting from president morsi's address? >>reporter: well, it is a remarkable situation where you have a country ramming through a constitution in one day's time if an attempt to head off more protests. the exact affect could be the reverse, to inflame the protests that we have seen the past seven days. this is tape recording and there will be a explanation of the extraordinary power and the explanation of the constitution. it will go to the peopl
didn't always look like this. the original burned down during the civil war. workers rebuilt this one here in the 1600s. so let's take a stroll right through the gate. you have to go through this right here, this big wooden block, and on the other side you'll see a beautiful array of maple trees. and if you walk a little bit further across this path that you'll see, you'll actually find something completely different. beyond this you'll see something that is a little different. doesn't seem to quite fit with the rest of the temple, but that's what makes it so unique. along with traditional temple buildings, there's also a western-style aqueduct. the arched brick and granite waterway was built in the 19th century. people used it to transport water and goods to and from lake biwa in neighboring shiga prefecture. many protested its construction at the time because it is so drastically different from the rest of the temple. but now people say it fits right in. you can hear the water trickling through even today. and behind the aqueduct, you see the beautiful mountains right outside the ci
a tendency to destroy their civil and their political righ rights. to be more safe they, at length, become willing to run the risk of being less free." our nation's founders warned us about the grave danger of sacrificing our most basic liberties in the pursuit of security -- security at all costs. they provided us with the constitution framed to prevent precisely such a tragic outcome. i urge my colleagues to vote in favor of the feinstein-lee amendment and against the mistaken idea that the government may detain american persons indefinitely without charge and without trial. thank you, mr. president. i yield back the rest of my time to senator feinstein. mrs. feinstein: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. feinstein: mr. president, the amendment before you is cosponsored by the distinguished senator who just spoke, senator lee, senator coons, collins, paul, lautenberg, gillibrand, kirk, tester, johnson, sanders, whitehouse, heller, baucus, demint, webb, klobuchar, bingaman, rockefeller, begich, boxer, and a -- an amendment somewhat similar to this, all
on the civil side and used to apply under the a.l.i. test and now we have a new distribution of being able to distinguish right from wrong. so now we have two completely different distributions that we're drawing that bright line on. >> competent versus volitional. we can decide that cognitive isn't sufficient, but it is the basis where we draw the line. sorry. >> ok. so to get back to the science, do you see how the research that you're doing and this imaging and identification of areas in the brain that may be part of primarily psychopathy which we're talking about today, how would that be used in the courtroom? what is your opinion? >> classically individuals who have those trades, the lack of empathy, those traits predict future recidivism. if you're an offender and scored very high on those traits, you have a four to eight times increased risk of reoffending when released if you're an inmate. it is an construct on a future dangerness issue and used in risk assessment. the literature has done, it has helped us to understand that there are, that since the brains are very different, they
civil commitment. >> professor. >> i'm going to add, do this a little bit shorter, i think, which is let's start with a question to everybody in the audience. all right, so if you like chocolate cake, raise your left hand. if you do not like chocolate cake, raise your right hand. all people who like chocolate cake left hand, don't like chocolate cake right hand. all right, hands down. how many people found it difficult to raise your hand by yourself? not very many. great, you made a choice. you thought about it. you decided and you acted. and my concept of what free will is the ability to act consistent with your preferences and desires. just that simple. now how many people here feel like you have control over whether or not you like chocolate cake? raise either hands. fewer, right. so there are two different things going on that we often conflate when we talk about free will. one is your predispositions to preferences and desires, ok. that may be impulsivity, that may be violence, that may be anti-social personality disorder, that may be a preference for chocolate cake, a preference fo
something would make you -- >> it is creepy when it comes out the of -- out of the mouths of the civil servants and creepy when it comes out of the mouth of warren buffet. everybody is telling us what our happiness depends on. >> i think you are right. >> john, i agree that this is absurd, but this is the world we live in. it is policy based on how it will make people feel. >> to say it out loud it will raise the morale of the middle class taking money from somebody richer when we are not doing anything for the middle class to make them richer. isn't that absurd that somebody actually says that on television? >> i think it is absurd, but i think give him credit for actually saying what is going on here. he is like the first person. he thinks that will happen and middle class people will feel better. >> if i -- if you want to make people feel better stop talking about taxes. if you had a flat tax which we would -- if you don't -- if you stop saying oh well they are paying the same tax rate at you, who cares? if they made $5 million they are paying more than those who make $50,000. >> es
, this is a meeting for meeting's sake and the sake itself is a good one. this is about democracy. right? here's this -- i think we'll get a picture from the white house. here are the two of them having lunch together. this is about civility. this is about the civility of democracy and i think in and of itself that's plenty and i don't expect much more. >> well, at least we tried. at least we try. that's what they can say. listen. you were on the stage with these men face to face. you got to see them react when you moderated the second presidential debate. are there any points where these two could, could come together maybe, a meeting of the minds on anything or ideological differences too wide here? >> no. there's always some place that people can come together. but what do they both mention on election night? we both love america and want the best for america. so that's where the commonality here is in a democracy. and i didn't mean to suggest that it was -- i mean, i think that it's important for democracy to see this picture. but where can they meet? i mean, the president talking about do
promote high standards of journalism and protect both the public interest and the rights and liberties of individuals. is it should set and enforce standards. hear individual complaints against its members, and provide a fair, quick, and inexpensive arbitration service to deal with civil law claims. the chair and the other members of the body must be dependent and appointed by a fair and open process. it must comprise a majority of members who are independent of the press. it should not include any serving editor or politician. that can be readily achieved by an appointments panel which could itself include a current editor, but with a substantial majority, demonstrably independent of the press, and of politicians. in the report, i explain who might be involved. although i make some recommendations in this area, it is absolutely not my role to think to establish a new press standards code or decide how an independent self-regulatory body would go about its business. as to a standards code, i recommend the development of an industry economy which could include serving editors. that comm
other top stories in "the situation room" right now. what's the latest? >> cleared for the crash of a concord jet 12 years ago. while the criminal charges were unjustified, the airline still must pay civil penalties of more than $1 million. the court agreed that the concord ran over a strip of metal that had fallen off of a continental plane causing it to blow a tire as it took off from the airport. 113 people died in that crash. and black friday sales may have been a little too good for toys r us. after offering incentive after incentive to shop early, well, it seems the company hasn't been able to keep up with demand. its facebook page has plenty of people now complaining. many of them placed orders online only to find out that the company later canceled those purchases because it didn't have enough in stock. and the original bat mobile, yes, it could be yours for at least a few hundred thousand dollars. the bat mobile used in the 1960s batman tv series, it is expected to go on the auction block in january. it was customized from a 1955 lincoln concept car. on tv the car could
to be a civil war between the view of people like steve and the view of some on the hard right. and i thought up here i'm not going to say a challenging thing about governor romney or pour snalt any wounds. but a few hours ago governor romney did a conference call to thank some of his donors. and he said that the reason he lost was that the president had given gifts, his word gifts to young people in the form of student loans and student loan repayment process. gifts to the latino policy by saying dream act kids would not be deported over the coming years. gifts of healthcare. so that says fundamental misreading about what happened. i'll pour more salt in the wound. paul ryan said the reason we won is because we did tpwhell you shallen areas. we won his hometown by 24 points and he lost it by ten and it's not an you shallen area. so it's disturbing within eighty days there is that think about that gift to young people, latinos. gifts of contraception to women. so if that's your diagnosis, and it actually has eerie echoes of the 47%. so to the think of soul searching. governor romney is going off
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)